Foods

29 09, 2020

Weight Loss Secrets

2020-09-29T14:03:42+00:00By |Ailments, Foods, Nutrition|

How to Successfully Lose Weight

So many people come to see me with the problem of not being able to lose weight despite hard work, going to the gym, and following a diet

weight loss naturopath

Frustration is the result. But, there are a number of key body functions that need to be working well for weight loss to occur. If they are out of balance or not operating well your efforts will be poorly rewarded. Understanding this can make a massive difference to losing weight, but unfortunately, it’s not something mentioned by Doctors and weight loss organizations very often.

KEY AREAS TO FOCUS ON FOR SUCCESSFUL WEIGHT LOSS

1) Bile and liver function

Bile is produced by the liver and released from the gall bladder into the digestive tract. It helps us digest and breakdown fats as well as acting as a laxative and transporting waste and toxins from the body. Insufficient bile production will make it harder to lose weight. I find that the gall bladder will almost always be an issue where weight loss is difficult. It contributes to hypothyroidism, constipation, hormonal imbalance and weight gain.

2) “Eating fat makes you fat” is a myth

In fact healthy fats like flax seed, olive oil, coconut oil (both cold pressed and virgin), grass fed butter, avocados, and eggs all help your body produce hormones that reduce inflammation and aid metabolism. This is important because a faster metabolism means your body will be burning up fuel more efficiently. In addition, reduced inflammation results in many health benefits and helps to allow the body to lose weight.

3) Hormonal imbalance

Excess estrogen contributes to gall bladder disease and fluid retention among other health problems. If there is excess estrogen in the body, this in turn puts an extra stress and load on the liver and gall bladder, which, as mentioned above, will have a knock on effect on the body’s ability to lose weight.

4) Fluid retention

Commonly, 3-4kg of extra unwanted weight is actually trapped fluid in the body. Hormonal and mineral imbalances as well as lymphatic congestion will contribute to this. By taking natural remedies, such as celery seed and juniper, as well as other minerals, excess fluid can be eliminated from the body.

5) Thyroid

An under active thyroid will mean your metabolism will slow down, in turn holding onto more weight. Mostly this is related to an autoimmune condition, but when reading this information I think you’ll see how other factors, such as hormonal imbalance, liver and gall bladder function will also impact your thyroid function.

6) Adrenal exhaustion

Adrenal exhaustion will interfere with progesterone production thus allowing excess estrogen to dominate. Fatigue can be another side effect. As mentioned above, this excess estrogen will put an extra load on the gall bladder and liver function, while also affecting the thyroid.

7) Blood sugar balance

If you have erratic blood sugar swings you can gain weight easily. When insulin is high sugars and carbs in your diet get converted to fat, and the body will store this fat typically around the waist, but will also start to find other places, such as the liver and even the arteries.

Eating a low carb/sugar diet reduces stress on your liver and blood sugar levels. Avoiding or limiting high carb foods (bread, pasta, potato, rice, alcohol, cakes and biscuits ) to lose weight is a key step. If you do want to have some carbs, have them for dinner rather than breakfast and lunch, as this will be less of a problem for weight loss.

Another issue is that gluten, found in a lot of high carb foods, will contribute to an under active thyroid, which in turn makes weight loss harder.

Intermittent fasting, which means eating during a small part of the day (eg from 4-8pm), results in less insulin being produced, so less fat storage. If you would like any advice on this let me know.

8) Exercise

Exercise helps hormonal balance and of course burns up energy. But remember, if one has a banana and a muffin for breakfast you will need to run about 10 kilometres to burn it up. That’s a lot. Exercise helps with weight loss, but too much emphasis is put on calories and exercise, and not enough on having your body working in balance, unhindered, paving the way for easier weight loss.

Summary

You can probably see a picture starting to form here, whereby different parts of your body need to be in balance in order to achieve effective weight loss. Just trying to target one of these areas alone will have minimal results.

If you want to lose weight, look at all of the above in its entirety. However, the most important single factor is having low carbohydrates, as this will mean that less insulin is produced in your body and less inflammation – allowing your body as a whole to operate more effectively.

Having good energy levels will help achieve a good metabolic rate. As you can see there is a strong digestion and hormonal link too.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

17 03, 2020

Coronavirus & Naturopathy

2020-03-17T16:13:27+00:00By |Ailments, Foods|

How to Protect Yourself Naturally from the Coronavirus

There are some very simple things you can do that can help put you in a stronger position

The Coronavirus is also known as NCP, which stands for Novel Coronavirus Pneumonia. A key factor is how it affects the respiratory system. This is why the main concern is with the elderly, people with existing respiratory problems and serious illnesses.

There are powerful and effective antiviral natural remedies that also boost your immune system. What’s more, diet can play a very big role.

Diet

Foods to enjoy:

Foods to boost the immune system are those that are the high in antioxidants, such as berries, green leafy vegetables, garlic, onions, and colourful vegetables, such as peppers, beetroots, carrots, etc. Protein is also important, such as meat, fish, eggs.

Foods to avoid:

The key foods to avoid are those that cause inflammation and congestion in the body. Sugar is key with this, and so are most dairy products, as they create mucus and congestion. In light of the fact that this virus affects the respiratory system, this is very important.

Natural Remedies to Help Protect You

There are potentially many, but these are the key ones:

Garlic – as mentioned above, garlic is helpful in protecting your immune system. You can cook with it, but medicinally it is best to have it raw. This can be done by chopping up a clove and swallowing it, on a full stomach. This should be done at least once a day, and can be done more frequently.

Vitamin D3 – this helps fight respiratory infections (bacterial or viral). The quantity to take daily as a preventative for an adult should be 4,000 iu per day. Vitamin D3 is often combined with K2, which is fine if you are not on medication – but if you are on medications you should check compatibility. Higher amounts of D3 can be taken to protect the immune system; it is one of the most important things that can be done to boost immunity.

Vitamin C – This is antiviral and helps boost the immune system. Quantities needed for an adult are 3,000-5,000mg per day.

Other remedies – these linclude Elderberry, Echinacea, Andrographis, and Olive Leaf Extract.

Homeopathics – There are many homeopathic remedies to help protect against viruses and remedies that can help to overcome it. Some have a flu vaccination type effect and others are to boost your immune system.

Your Program

It’s best to get in touch with me to find out what the best combination of remedies is for you, taking into consideration your present medication and state of health.

You are welcome to get in touch and I can recommend a small program to help strengthen your immune system and protect you.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

 

24 05, 2019

FODMAP Diet Plan

2019-06-18T12:46:30+00:00By |Ailments, Foods, Nutrition|

The FODMAP diet plan & IBS

Not only is the FODMAP diet useful in helping IBS, it can also be beneficial for a range of other health complaints too. There are other specific diets, such as Ketogenic and Paleo that are also well known for helping with digestive complaints and general good health. Finding which suits you best is key.

FODMAP is an acronym for a group of mostly sugars that become fermented and are not well digested. FODMAP stands for fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols. These include sugars found in fructose, lactose, fructans, galactans and polyols.

IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS)

The FODMAP diet was created in Australia and was discovered to help IBS symptoms. What’s more, a very high carbohydrate diet was shown to be strongly associated with IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) and other digestive issues.

In my time as a Naturopath and Nutritionist, I’ve learnt that IBS symptoms, such as bloating, digestive cramps, swings from constipation to loose bowels, diarrhea and wind are often things people just put up with. While the symptoms may not be too troublesome, over months and years IBS can contribute to a more serious deterioration of the bowel, leaky gut and coeliacs disease. In fact,  Leaky gut is common for those with IBS. These conditions have a knock on effect contributing to such a long list of illnesses, from migraines and headaches, to skin problems and inflammation in the body.

GLUTEN FREE

Gluten is found in wheat, rye, spelt, and sometimes oats. These are the first foods to eliminate with IBS and bowel problems.

Gluten is found more in our food today than it used to be because of genetic engineering, which renders the gluten content in wheat to be much higher than previously. This is one of the reasons why our grandparents didn’t seem to have such a problem with gluten. Compounding this issue, processing and cooking methods are very different today.

Our grandparents also ate a lot less sugar, in all its forms. Today supermarket shelves are full of foods not only packed with sucrose but also fructose. Fructose is a lot more absorbable than cane sugar, so it hits our blood sugar balancing systems much harder, puts pressure on the liver and creates more inflammation in the body.

Sugar generally is very pro-inflammatory and creates unwanted acidity in our blood, which is why it is a major food that promotes disease and illness in our bodies.

There’s no doubt that many people with IBS who avoid gluten and most grains feel better. This is in part because of the inflammation it can create in the gut and body, such as with eczema and psoriasis. It is also found in high carbohydrate (high sugar) foods, such as bread, pastries and pasta.

During the FODMAP studies by Monash University, the participants significantly improved when they avoided gluten and whey (cow’s dairy proteins), and every participant worsened when gluten and whey proteins were introduced.

HOW DOES FODMAP COMPARE WITH THE PALEO AND KETOGENIC DIETS?

It’s interesting to note, such as the Paleo diet, and in particular the Ketogenic diet play important roles in reducing inflammation in the body. This inflammation contributes to skin conditions, like eczema, acne, psoriasis and other complaints, such as migraines and headaches, inflammatory bowel disease and IBS.

The Paleo diet is low in grains and dairy. This compares with the Ketogenic diet, which is low in grains, but not restrictive of dairy. The Ketogenic diet recommends healthy fats, such as butter and coconut oil. This is so we get our energy from ‘clean fuel’ rather than dirty, damaging foods, which come from high carbohydrate foods, such as bread and pasta, and in particular sugar and fructose.

The FODMAP, Paleo and Ketogenic diets all have in common a low level of fermentable sugars, which is in fact what FODMAP stands for. These sugars can create an unhealthy balance of bad to good bacteria in the body. The microbiom (or microorganisms in the body) that are essential for a good immune system and optimal health, can be thrown out of balance. If there is an environment that supports bad bacteria to thrive, when high sugars are present particularly in the gut, SIBO, thrush and candida overgrowth can thrive, contributing to more ill health.

HIGH FODMAP FOODS (TO AVOID)

Vegetables: artichokes, asparagus, cauliflower, garlic, peas, leeks, mushrooms, onions, sugar snap peas.

Fruits: apples, cherries, dried fruit, mango, nectarines, peaches, pears, plums, watermelon.

Dairy and whey products: cow’s milk, custard, evaporated milk, ice cream, yogurt, condensed milk.

Protein sources: legumes, pulses, some meats.

Breads and cereals: wheat, rye, barley, biscuits and snack products.

Sugars, sweetners and candy: high fructose corn syrup, honey, sugar free candy.

Nuts: cashews and pistachios.

Corn is gluten free, but is also a high carbohydrate food that can contribute to a lot of digestive complaints, so I recommend keeping clear of it.

FODMAP FRIENDLY FOODS

There are low FODMAP food alternatives. However, simply by avoiding the high FODMAP foods listed above, you are doing a great job.

You can include grains such as quinoa, rice, and gluten free breads, which are fine. However, it’s worth noting, that in some cases I take people off gluten free breads and they can feel better. So in this it’s worth trying to see how you feel.

WHICH DIET IS BEST FOR YOU?

There has been a lot of hype around the FODMAP diet, and there are some really valid benefits to it. The main one that I believe stands out is avoiding gluten. It’s interesting that the Paleo and Ketogenic diets, also eliminate gluten. Keeping sugars low is also of great benefit to most people.

My word of caution in relation to the FODMAP diet is that getting sufficient healthy fats in our diets today is really important. So my diet of choice tends to be the Ketogenic diet, which encourages plenty of healthy fats, including dairy fats of a certain type.

If you are tackling IBS or wanting to follow a healthier diet, get in touch and we can talk through the best diet for you. I am a big believer in tailoring diets to specific needs. We can learn a lot from the FODMAP diet, but each of these diets I’ve mentioned have positives and negatives, and I would like to help you find the right diet for you. For pregnant women, or those with certain health issues, dietary changes should be done carefully and with guidance, so please get in touch before making any changes.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

2 04, 2019

Leaky Gut – How & Why To Fix this Important Problem

2019-06-18T21:22:55+00:00By |Ailments, Foods, Nutrition, Vitamins|

Leaky Gut: How & Why To Fix this Important Problem

Leaky gut, also known as increased intestinal permeability has been linked to many health problems.

There are about 100 trillion bacteria (good and bad) in our gut, which affect our entire body, from how we feel mentally and emotionally, to metabolism and sleep quality.They can be knocked out of kilter with poor diet, antibiotics, and stress.

When this happens, you can start to feel really quite unwell, with a whole host of symptoms from migraines, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, autoimmune disease, and even more serious issues.

What is leaky gut syndrome?

Your digestive system has a vital function within your body. It is the barrier that keeps nutrients in and toxins/pathogens out. Keeping the gut lining healthy is important, and this is where healthy gut bacteria play their role.

If the gut microbe is unhealthy, leaky gut can start to develop. What this really means is that toxins can leak back through the lining of the gut and into the bloodstream.

How can you tell if you have ‘Leaky Gut?’

Leaky gut presents itself in many ways, but common symptoms include:

Leaky gut has also been linked with coeliac disease, multiple sclerosis and even autism, among other conditions.

HOW TO FIX LEAKY GUT SYNDROME

There is a lot you can do with diet to support your gut lining.

Diet is by far the most important factor in making your gut work. By keeping your gut microbiota in healthy balance, you can boost your immune system, support your digestion, remove environmental toxins from your body, and prevent leaky gut.

1) Include anti-inflammatory foods that are nutrient dense

To help get a handle on chronic inflammation, dietary changes can make a big difference.

  • This includes eliminating or greatly reducing added-sugar and alcohol from your diet. Candida and yeast thrive on sugar, and yeast overgrowth is one of the things that causes problems with the gut lining.
  • Stick with a varied diet of whole and unprocessed foods. This will bring a diversity of good bacteria into your gut to support the lining and gut integrity. It is worth noting that gut bacteria are related to the bacteria found in the soil – so my recommendation is to shop at your local market if you can, rather than your supermarket, so that foods are fresher and more in their natural state.
  • There are some foods that contribute to leaky gut. Wheat and gluten – which includes breads, pizza, pastries, pasta, some cereals, crackers, couscous, and gluten products, from cakes and muffins to biscuits and cookies. Following a gluten free diet is more manageable these days than in was previously, with many substitutes available. Processed meats – from  deli meats to bacon and sausages. Junk food – from crisps, sugary cereals and confectionery, etc. Pasteurized dairy – including milk, cheese, cream, ice cream. Refined oils – all refined oils, often vegetable oils, including canola, sunflower and rapeseed.  Artificial sweeteners: Aspartame, sucralose and saccharin – try stevia as a replacement. Drinks – avoid alcohol, fizzy drinks and other sugary drinks.
  • Include prebiotic foods that encourage good bacteria in the gut: examples are sweet potato, carrots, asparagus.
  • Include probiotic foods: these include sauerkraut, yogurt, kefir, pickles. In fact fermented food like raw sauerkraut can often be a better source of probiotics than supplements found in health food stores.
  • Find out if you have a food allergy or allergies. This can be done with Kinesiology testing or other forms of testing. Then I recommend keeping away from these foods as they will contribute to irritation in the gut.
  • Bone broth is a a great way to get vital amino acids which help with tissue repair and gut healing and healthy digestion.

2) Supplement to support the gut

  • Prebiotics: Prebiotics feed intestinal bacteria that produce short-chain fatty acids, which are important for the mucosal cells that create a healthy gut lining.
  • Probiotics: If you don’t want to add fermented food to your daily diet, you can supplement with a good quality probiotic from your local health food store.
  • Digestive enzymes: These are often compromised when leaky gut is present. Things like grains and legumes can be problematic and you can try avoiding these and at the same time add a good quality digestive supplement to your diet can help improve digestion and the absorption of nutrients and vitamins.
  • L-glutamine: An anti-inflammatory amino acid that is a priority when fixing and health leaky gut. It helps to cover cell walls and eliminate unwanted pests.

3) Tackle stress levels
The body works in mysterious ways sometimes, and you might be surprised to hear that studies have shown that stress affects the gut-brain axis, the pathway between your brain and your gut.

4) Too much sugar and a history of medications
Clearing  out of your body a history of too much sugar or medications, such as antibiotics, contraceptive pill, anti-inflammatories is important too. This is because these drugs can continue to cause damage in the cells of your digestive system, despite you having stopped them. Homeopathy is excellent at clearing out the damage that such things as antibiotics and sugar can cause.

Taking care of your gut is a great way to feeling better in so many ways, from vitality and energy, depression and anxiety to pain and memory problems.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

18 03, 2019

Herbal Teas & Their Surprising Health Benefits

2019-04-02T10:54:54+00:00By |Ailments, Foods, Nutrition, Vitamins|

Most of us drink tea or coffee at some point in the day

What if I told you that adding herbal teas into your daily routine is one of those simple things you can easily do from home that can help with how you feel?

I’m not talking about fruit teas that you find on the supermarket shelves, rather herbal teas. Many supermarkets stock these today, and health food stores certainly do. What’s more you can grow herbs in pots in the kitchen or outside.

I grow lots of kitchen herbs in our garden and pick an array of herbs, especially in the spring and summer, and simply allow them to steep in boiled water for 15 minutes before drinking. This makes a lovely drink and is a powerful way to consume micronutrients, vitamins and minerals and enjoy the medicinal, alkalizing and restorative properties at the same time.

If you are pregnant or on medication, please use caution and get advice before drinking herbal teas – my advice is generally to steer clear of all herbal teas during pregnancy, unless specifically advised otherwise.

Traditional Uses of Herbal Teas

If you are pregnant, please take caution and get advice before drinking herbal teas – my advice is generally to steer clear of herbal teas during pregnancy.

Chamomile: Buds
Relaxing and calming tea, often drunk before bed or for calming nerves and anxiety and for an upset tummy.

Nettles: Leaf
Often used to aid detoxification, as well as high content in things like iron, chlorophyll and minerals and vitamins. It’s reputation as a seasonal allergy remedy has been around for many years.

Peppermint: Leaves
Digestive tonic for bloating, gas and upset tummies.

Rosemary: Leaves
Powerful antioxidant often used to help with memory and concentration, increase circulation and soothe aching muscles.

Thyme: Leaves
Often used as a natural cough remedy, it is also renowned for blocking the growth of organisms, including certain types of harmful bacteria and viruses.

Oregano: Leaves
Antibacterial, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory – and research suggests it exhibits anticancer activity.

Mint: Leaves
Traditionally used as a digestive tonic and calming tea.

Passionflower: Leaves
For its relaxing and soporific properties – a perfect bedtime tea.

Rose Hips: Buds once the bloom has expired
Vitamin C, D, E and K, and commonly used to boost the immune system, improve digestion and as a general detoxing and nervous system tonic.

Lemon Balm: Leaves
As a calming and sedative tea, which has often been used for anxiety, irritability, stress and insomnia, as well as a nervous stomach.

Echinacea: Buds
This tea has a great history for its affinity with the immune system.

Milk Thistle: Buds
A long history in relation to its usage for detoxification.

Catnip: Leaves
A calming herb.

Raspberry: Leaf
As a tonic for the female reproductive system. This should be avoided by pregnant women.

Lavender: Buds
Calming tea

Red Clover: Buds
Renowned for detoxification and purifying properties.

Dandelion: Root
Weeds found in many people’s garden’s, have a history of being used as a blood liver and gallbladder tonic.

Dandelion: Leaf
Rich in iron, zinc, potassium, manganese and more – has a long history for use as a diuretic, water retention, high blood pressure and nourishment for the kidneys.

Lemongrass: Stalk
For digestion and calming properties.

Ginger: Root
Digestive tonic, morning sickness, colds and flus. Ginger tea should be avoided if you are on blood thinners.

If you have any questions or would like further assistance with your health please get in touch.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

13 03, 2019

What’s Your Skin Telling You?

2019-03-13T20:02:27+00:00By |Ailments, Foods, Nutrition, Vitamins|

Our skin is a reflection of our inner health, and a much larger pattern of susceptibility and disease tendency

It is the largest organ in the body, and a very important indicator of what’s going on inside. Having great looking skin is what most of us focus on, but in reality, if something’s not right with your skin it’s worth digging deeper and sorting it out.

The body is an amazing machine, and tries to express imbalance, intolerance and inflammation in the most superficial and the least invasive way. So, eczema for example, is often viewed by Naturopath’s as a safety valve – nature’s way of releasing problems within the body through the skin. By eliminating through the skin, it means that the issue doesn’t show up within deeper tissues and organs, causing more difficult problems, which can happen quickly or many years later.

Suppressing eczema or acne with topical and oral medications, is definitely not within the realms of Naturopathy. The idea is to rebalance, alleviate, detox and treat the underlying cause to help pave the way for a healthier future and glowing skin.

Common causes underlying skin problems

Problems ranging from eczema, psoriasis, oily skin, acne, dry flaky skin, excessive sweating, cracked heals and hard skin to thin skin, itchiness, acne rosacea, cysts, dark circles under eyes and easy bruising, can all be addressed by looking at underlying causes.

Causes can include:

  • Poor digestive function, such as gut inflammation and poor nutritional uptake.
  • Lack of essential fatty acids, vitamins A, C and Zinc
  • Irregularity of adrenal glands
  • Deficiency of blood or body fluids
  • Food sensitivities and intolerances
  • Toxic congestion in the body
  • Not enough healthy fats in the diet
  • Hormone imbalance
  • Lack of vitamin D

If you are frustrated with a nagging or irritating skin condition then it might be time to think about addressing some of the common underlying causes.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

28 02, 2019

Poor Diet ‘Biggest Contributor to Early Deaths Across the World’

2019-11-19T21:53:38+00:00By |Foods, Nutrition|

Being healthy and able to live a full and happy life is more dependent upon prevention and setting up healthy dietary habits than ever before.

It is far better to keep your arteries clear and your heart strong for example, than it is go to through a risky heart operation, suffer a stroke or gradually demise into dementia or Alzheimer’s.

While our emergency rooms are equipped to help with recovery from heart attacks and strokes, in truth the road to recovery after such events is often tough. Far reaching ramifications, affecting work-life, family-life, finances, depression, and more are path of the course.

The research and statistics show that diet plays a big role in prevention.

Diet & Prevention of Serious Disease

Prevention: always the preferred choice.

If you have a history of heart disease or cancer in your family for example, or you simply want to be as healthy as possible for as long as possible, paying attention to your diet and lifestyle is absolutely key.

Somebody asked me just yesterday, what is the single piece of dietary advice for good health that I can give. Here it is:

To eat fresh, seasonal, wholesome, unprocessed food – organic if possible.

The sort of diets our grandparents ate (because of what was available to them), is what I recommend we revert to. We really want to avoid processed foods as much as possible. An example of this is bread. Most bread in our supermarkets has a whole list of additives, which are unnecessary. What is bread after all, other than grains, rising agent, water and a bit of salt? So much of our food these days is available to us in packets, tins, and pre-prepared. So much of these are full of the unhealthy types of fats, and excess sugars. We really miss out by consuming mass-produced, packaged foods.

Sugar

It is estimated that an adult 150 years ago ate about 20 x less sugar than they do today. Sugar is an even bigger problem than simply the amount you consume. Today in our shops, foods include a range of types of sugar, from high fructose corn syrup to sucrose and icing sugar. Cooking at home means you can include healthy options, such as Maple Syrup and honey, and choose recipes that are generally low in sugar.

Omega 3:6 Ratio

It is estimated that modern Western diets typically have ratios of omega-6 to omega-3 in excess of 10 to 1, some as high as 30 to 1. The optimal ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 is estimated to be between 1:1 and 2.3:1, much like our ancestors would have had. The main sources of Omega 3 are fish. The major source of Omega 6 (to be limited) are from vegetable, canola/rapeseed oil, soy bean, and margarine.

Cooking from Scratch

Other benefits of cooking from scratch are not just about what to avoid. Including lots of plant based foods selected from seasonally fresh, local produce, healthy oils (such as coconut oil, avocados, nuts, olive oil, butter, and more), and bone broths is beneficial. You can also choose the quality of dairy products and meats and fish that you may want to cook with – such as organic and grass fed for example.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

4 05, 2018

Easy, Delicious, Nutrient-Dense, Lunch Recipe

2019-11-19T22:03:05+00:00By |Ailments, Foods, Nutrition|

It’s so easy to grab a sandwich or sausage roll at lunch time, especially with our busy lives and eating on the run.

The problem with this is that consuming too many wrong types of sugars and carbs is not good for us, since it adds to inflammation, congestion in the body and can affect weight. What’s more, having such lunches displaces much healthier alternatives.

If you can make a switch to healthy lunches, it’s just another nudge redirecting your health into the future.

For example a soup based on bone broth, which is an excellent way to boost digestion, brain health and immunity, is an ideal lunch. Bone broth is a wonderful remedy in its own right, packed with nutrients, amino acids, collagen and gelatin. Combining the broth with turmeric, chili, vegetables and coconut oil makes a wonderful elixir or tonic for the system. When we prepare a meal, such as this, every ingredient is health-promoting and we are not filling up on empty calories or un-nutritious and potentially damaging foods.

With a little bit of planning we can turn our lunches in a powerhouse of nutrition.

My favourite thing to have for lunch, because I know how nourishing and revitalizing it is, is homemade soup. You can cook a big batch of soup and freeze it into portion sizes, and then just heat it up as you need it.

The basis of a healthy soup is good quality, homemade bone broth or vegetable stock. Click here for how to make bone broth and to find out more information on why it is so important for our health.

POWERHOUSE SOUP RECIPE

Ingredients:

Bone broth
7 carrots roughly chopped (you can use other vegetables, such as pumpkin or butternut squash)
½ cauliflower roughly chopped
2 leeks roughly chopped
1 large onion diced
5 cloves of garlic finely chopped
1 teaspoon of turmeric
2 tablespoons of coconut oil
1 dried birds eye chilli (more to taste)
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
Sea salt to taste

Method:

  1. Melt coconut oil in a large saucepan.
  2. Add garlic, leeks and onion and cook on a medium heat until soft.
  3. Add carrots, cauliflower or any preferred vegetables and stir into the mixture briefly.
  4. Add turmeric and black pepper and stir briefly.
  5. Pour in the broth so that it covers the vegetables well, put the lid on, and turn heat down so that the soup is simmering. Allow to simmer for 20-30 minutes, until the vegetables are soft.
  6. Take off the heat and blend with a blending stick.

The beauty of this recipe, is that you can adjust it as you like, swap and change ingredients, but always using a healthy broth as a base. Cooking from scratch can seem demanding, but once you get into the swing of it, it is fun and so rewarding. What’s more, cooking in large batches means you’ll have plenty of healthy meals stacked up in the freezer.

As always if you have any questions about your health please write to me and I’m very happy to call you back.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

4 05, 2018

Bone Broth Health Benefits

2019-07-05T17:45:23+00:00By |Foods, Nutrition, Vitamins|

Bone broth is not only cheap and easy to make, it is actually packed with valuable minerals and gelatin that are easily absorbed by the body with profound affects.

Bone broth promotes proper digestion by supporting the healing and sealing of the gut. It also helps to inhibit infections, such as colds and flus; fights inflammation and pain, such as in the joints, and promotes strong healthy hair, nails and bones.

Bone broth is an old-time staple. Traditionally homes would have bones simmering away on the cooker top and it was a way of life. Broth would be used in soups, stews or drunk on it on its own – increasing the density of nutrition and goodness in any meal it was added to. The loss of this tradition is just another example of how our diets have changed in recent time. The diets of our ancestors (who experienced much less serious disease) was packed with unprocessed, organic whole foods and bone broth. There are many more bone broth benefits and reasons to reintroduce bone broth as much as possible into our diets.

Leaky gut is one of the most common things I see in practice. It is in fact an important underlying factor in a wide range of health problems, from allergies and autoimmune disorders to depression, migraines, lymphatic congestion and skin problems. Collagen, which is in bone broth, has a soothing and healing action that promotes the sealing of the gut lining.

The best way to get bone broth is to make it yourself. Using the carcass of a cooked chicken, fish bones, or bones left over from any meal is a perfect way to do it – or you can often find the butchers will have some very cheaply. If you can use bones from organic or grass fed animas this is ideal as it will likely have the most gel. This is something we make in my family most weeks because I know what a cheap and easy way it is to boost what my family get from their meals.

COOKING THE STOCK

Put the bones in a large saucepan or crock pot and cover with water. Add a couple of tablespoons of apple cider vinegar and leave to stand for half an hour before putting it on the heat; this gives the vinegar time to help draw the nutrients out of the bones.

Next roughly chop one or two carrots, an onion, and perhaps some celery or some other suitable vegetables that you may want to use up, such as leeks. You can also add herbs if you have any to hand, such as thyme, bay leaves, oregano. It’s not an exact science!

Bring the broth to the boil, skim off the scum on the surface, lower the heat so it can simmer really gently for 12-24 hours. You can always turn it off an night and resume the simmer in the morning. You can also use a slow cooker if you prefer.

When it’s ready you can strain it, put it in containers and use it make soups, risottos and stews, or drink it. It will keep in the fridge for several days, but will also freeze well.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

16 04, 2018

Repercussions of a Rundown Nervous System

2018-04-16T10:20:05+00:00By |Ailments, Foods, Nutrition|

80% of the people that come and see me have a rundown nervous system

avocado health benefitsIt is without doubt one of the most common things I diagnose with iridology and in a consultation.

The reason why it is so important is because it is the communication system of the body – quite similar to the wiring that exists in any machine. When the nervous system gets rundown it acts in a sponge-like way soaking up and robbing energy from other parts of the body.

Conversely, when we don’t have a rundown nervous system energy and vitality can flow throughout the body – aiding all the parts of the body to which it is communication with. This includes digestion, circulation, endocrine system and of course and probably most importantly how we feel mentally.

Signs of Rundown Nervous System

A rundown nervous system can affect each and every one of us in a different way, but the most common are complaints of fatigue, depression, anxiety, stress, irritability, lack of motivation, poor mental clarity and concentration (mental fog). In fact, it has an insidious nature with knock on affects across other parts of the body, which are not so obviously related to the nervous system, such as digestive disorders, acid reflux, constipation, and many more. In such cases, the immediate assumption can be made by practitioners that the problem lies in these specific parts of the body, yet correcting the nervous system as the underlying cause can sometimes be a simple answer, especially when other signs of a rundown nervous system are present.

What Causes a Rundown Nervous System?

There are two basic causes:

  1. Poor nutritional status:
    Often people say to me, “I eat well, don’t eat junk food, why am i rundown and feel this way?” one of the problems with our food these days is that it contains about 60% less nutritional value that of our grandparents. Another factor affecting nutritional status is our ability to absorb nutrients out of our food. Today, generally we eat far more sugar and take a lot more pharmaceutical medicines, such as antibiotics and painkillers, than our predecessors, and these are just two examples of how nutrient absorption is affected. Higher quantities of stimulants, such as coffee, tea, energy drinks, can further drain the body of nutrients. Alcohol also has a depleting affect on our nutritional status. Many factors weave together to determine how much nutrition we absorb from our food. So even if you decide to eat a healthy, organic diet, if you digestive system is not absorbing the nutrients efficiently much of the goodness will be lost. So this is often an area that needs addressing too.
  2. Stress:
    High levels of stress, emotional trauma, and other mental demands, drain the nervous system. (Of course there can be other factors to take into account when looking at how someone is feeling emotionally, such as adrenal fatigue or thyroid conditions.)

The problem can seem like the chicken and the egg scenario, whereby emotional problems can cause a rundown nervous system, in the same way that a rundown nervous system can cause emotional problems.

Nutrition to Help Boost the Nervous System

Diet of course will play a key role in ensuring your body has the nutritional tools and equipment it needs to operate optimally, this is despite the quality of food not being as it used to be.  Boosting your nervous system with some of the following foods is a good place to start:

  • Avocados

  • Acorn squash

  • Bananas

  • Spinach

  • Sweet potatoes

  • Almonds

  • Dried pumpkin seeds

  • Swiss chard

There are varying degrees of a rundown nervous system, and I find that supplementing with key nutrients is usually also necessary – contact me to find out what specifically you need as this will vary from person to person, depending on one’s needs and what medication a person may be on.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

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