Foods

19 11, 2017

Healthy Treats

2017-11-19T17:15:42+00:00 By |Foods, Nutrition|

Are you looking for health snacks to make with your kids?

My small kids, aged 5 and 7, love treats! One of the things we enjoy doing on a Sunday afternoon is making healthy snack balls. This is a great way to make sure they get the pleasure and fun of their treats, while also knowing what exactly is in them and how much sugar! What’s more, adults love them too, with my wife eating variations of these for breakfast quite often too.

No cooking required, so kids can roll up their sleeves and get busy making these balls!

This couldn’t be easier.

The base for the balls is oats.

Then you can add all sorts of things ranging from crushed nuts, such as almonds or walnuts to seeds, such as sunflower, linseed or pumpkin seeds. Some dried fruits, such as raisins are a great way to add sweetness. As an extra treat you can also add a few dark chocolate bits. (Some children and adults have nut and other allergies, so take caution in regard to this.)

Mix everything into the bowel together, with the oats making up approximately 1/2 to 2/3 of the mixture.

Then you can add a few tablespoons of water and some coconut oil if you have some handy, until the mixture is just sticky enough to stick together. Then shape the mixture into small walnut sized balls and put on a plate in the fridge to set.

Kids and sugar intake

We all know that too much sugar is bad for us. In fact, Public Health England figures show that 4-10 year old children consume the average weight of a 5 year old in sugar per year, equivalent to 15 sugar cubes per day.

In a campaign to help parents control how much sugar kids eat, Public Health England have outlined how many grams of sugar a day children should be having per day:

  • 4-6 year olds: 19grams (5 sugar cubes)
  • 7-10 year olds: 24grams (6 sugar cubes)
  • 11 years olds +: 30grams (7 sugar cubes)

It’s not just the sugar to watch out for

One of the huge benefits of making treats with kids, instead of buying packets of biscuits and sweets, is that you can avoid bad fats, additives, various types of sugars and make them as healthy as possible. The other thing I love to see with my own children, is that they are learning from a young age how to cook food from scratch and don’t expect to buy everything in a packet, which sadly is the way shopping is going.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

 

 

18 10, 2017

Are You Eating the Right Fats?

2017-10-18T10:57:51+00:00 By |Foods, Nutrition, Uncategorized|

Eating the wrong fats can be devastating to our health and well-being, so it’s important to get this right

There are increasing amounts of research today supporting the theory that cholesterol and saturated fats are not the main villain in heart disease, as has traditionally been taught. When it comes down to it, there is very little evidence to support the traditional view that a low cholesterol and saturated fat diet reduces heart disease. What is coming to light, is that a combination of blood sugar problems, excess carbohydrates (sugars), inflammation, excess Omega 6 fats from vegetable oils and trans-fatty acids are responsible for arterial congestion. This in turn is related to such health issues as heart problems, dementia and stroke.

As a result, dietary advice for arterial health is being turned on its head.

WHICH FATS SHOULD WE BE EATING?

A fat free diet is not something I advocate. What matters, is how much fat and what type. Reducing your intake of some types of fats reduces the risk of several chronic diseases, but other types of fats are absolutely essential to our health and well-being, and in fact today there is a wide-scale deficiency in several kinds of fats, which is behind much of today’s ill-health. It’s always recommended to keep in touch with your Doctor if you have heart disease about changes to your diet.

GOOD FATS

The following are healthy fats that can be included in your diet – for more advice about this please contact me and I’m happy to advise further:

  • Cold pressed, virgin coconut oil, not refined. (Cooking with coconut oil is fine)
  • Cold pressed, virgin olive oil (uncooked/heated is best – olive oil heated to high temperatures becomes damaged)
  • Omega 3 fats obtained from fish (including such fish as mackerel, wild salmon, tuna, sardines, anchovies, krill oil)
  • Butter from grass fed cattle
  • Avocado
  • Nuts, such as almonds, walnuts, brazil nuts, hazel nuts, pecans, pistachios, macadamia (not peanuts or cashews)
  • Eggs (preferably organic)
  • Grass fed meats

FATS TO AVOID

The main fats to keep away from are trans fatty acids and polyunsaturated vegetable oils. These types of oils promote oxidized cholesterol that become destructive when entering into your LDL particles, thus making LDL particles damaging in this case. LDL fats are normally absorbed by the liver. Damaged LDL particles however can contribute to heart disease. So while LDL readings which are commonly used to measure cholesterol are of some use, what is most important is keeping LDL particles free from oxidation.

Additionally, excessive Omega 6 polyunsaturated fats when eaten in high quantities are vulnerable to oxidation.

Fats to avoid include:

  • Margarine
  • Vegetable oils, such as sunflower, corn, rapeseed, peanut, soy
  • Reheated oils
  • Refined palm oil
  • Rancid oils

COOKING FROM SCRATCH

One of the main problems with buying foods from the supermarket is that it’s very likely there will be some damaging fats included. For example, it’s pretty difficult to find biscuits, crisps or cakes made without damaging vegetable oils and transfatty acids. If you are buying pre-made meals too, you’ll find they usually contain oils that I urge my clients to avoid, as well as sugars.

The very best way to avoid the pitfalls of processed foods is to make your meals from scratch. This way you can be sure of the ingredients you are consuming.

HOW THE BODY USES FAT

The human body uses fatty acids to do everything from building cell membranes to performing key functions in the brain, eyes, and lungs. The functions of fats include:

  • Brain – Fats compose 60% of the brain and are essential to brain function, including learning abilities, memory retention and moods. Fats are especially important for pregnant women, since they are integral to foetal brain development.
  • Cells – Fatty acids help your cells stay moveable and flexible, as well as being responsible for building cell membranes.
  • Heart – 60% of our heart’s energy comes from burning fats. Specific fats are also used to help keep the heart beating in a regular rhythm.
  • Nerves – Fats compose the material that insulates and protects the nerves, isolating electrical impulses and speeding their transmission.
  • Lungs – Lungs require a high concentration of saturated fats, enables the lungs to work and keeps them from collapsing.
  • Eyes – Fats are essential to eye function.
  • Digestion – Fats in a meal slow down the digestion process so the body has more time to absorb nutrients, and help provide a constant level of energy and keeps the body satiated for longer periods of time. Fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K) can only be absorbed if fat is present.
  • Organs – Fats cushion and protect your internal organs.
  • Immune System – Fats ease inflammation, helping your metabolism and immune system stay healthy and functioning.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

 

16 10, 2017

Is Eating Yogurt as Good as Taking Probiotics?

2017-10-18T10:58:54+00:00 By |Foods, Nutrition, Uncategorized, Vitamins|

Many people ask me if they still need to take Probiotics when they are eating yogurt on a daily basis

Old-fashioned, raw and unpasteurized yogurt was a wonderful source of good bacteria, but unfortunately today it’s very difficult to find yogurt in this form.

Pasteurization kills off or sterilizes much of the good bacteria that gives yogurt it’s good reputation.

WHY DO WE NEED GOOD BACTERIA?

Cultured and fermented foods, such as yogurt, have been consumed by many cultures for years as a source of bacteria, which act as a support to their digestive health and immune function. Today, however, for many it is more practical to take a good quality probiotic supplement, in order to populate the digestive system with good bacteria.

Probiotics, also known as gut flora or healthy bacteria, is a variety of friendly bacteria that benefits the digestive system. The benefits range from helping to normalize digestive function to assisting the immune system, allergies and skin problems.

Probiotics are used to Help Treat & Prevent a Range of Health Conditions:

Probiotics are regularly used by Naturopaths to help treat and prevent the following health problems:

  • Thrush and candida
  • Leaky gut (and associated conditions, eg migraines, acne, lymphatic congestion, and more)
  • Eczema and acne
  • Colic and acid reflux
  • Fatigue
  • Autism
  • ADHD
  • Food allergies, such as dairy and gluten
  • Post-antibiotic diarrhea
  • Hay fever
  • Sinusitis
  • Weight loss
  • Vaginal infections
  • Diarrhea, constipation and irregular bowel motions
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Irritable bowel syndrome and malabsorption
  • Ulcerative colitis

Choosing the Right Probiotics for the Right Condition

The quality and potency of probiotics available in healthfood stores and our food varies enormously.  For example, some of my clients ask if the probiotics in supermarket yogurt is sufficient, but you would probably need a bucket of the yogurt to equal half a teaspoon of a good quality probiotic supplement. Likewise, products on the shelves of healthfood stores also have widely ranging potencies.

In a healthy bowel there can be 3-4 pounds of healthy bacteria, so to make an impact, you need a high potency product, which I usually recommend is taken at the highest dosage on the bottle for adults.

When looking for a supplement, I recommend you look out for supplements that list specific strands of bacteria on their label. I recommend a product with a variety of different probiotics. Also, the list below gives more detailed information about the health benefits of particular types.

  • Lactobacillus Acidophilus DDS1
    Helps with immune support and digestive function, as well as to assist with lactose intolerance
  • Bifidis Regularis
    Gut health and digestion
  • Bifidobacterium Infantis 35624
    IBS
  • Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12
    Immune system support and gut health
  • Lactobacillus Casei Shirota
    Immune system support and gut health
  • Lactobacillus Immunitas
    Immune system support, duration of colds and flu in older people
  • Lactobacillus Rhamnosus GR11
    Helps vaginal infections
  • Lactobacillus Reuteri 55730
    Helps with diarrhea associated by antibiotic usage
  • Saccharomyces Boulardii Yeast
    Helps with diarrhea associated by antibiotic usage

What Puts Healthy Bacteria in the Gut at Threat?

There are several key things which kill and undermine healthy bacteria in the gut, as well as things which fuel bad bacteria. The main things to be aware of are:

  • Antibiotics
  • Drugs
  • Some pharmaceutical medicines
  • Alcohol
  • Sugar
  • Stress

For more information about how to correct and rebalance your gut flora please contact me.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

12 10, 2017

The Hazards of Sugar

2017-10-18T11:00:21+00:00 By |Ailments, Cancer, Foods, Nutrition, Uncategorized|

Sugar is in fact essential to life, however sugar is a major contributing factor to much of today’s ill-health

Average dietary intake of sugar today is four times as much as it was 100 years ago, becoming a staple part of the Western diet.

If you walk into a supermarket today, most of the packaged and processed foods are packed with added-sugar in some form or other, even those that you find in healthfood sections. Added sugar is the problem, not sugar found in form of fructose in things like fresh fruit. The easiest and best way to get away from it is to cook from scratch, that way you know what is going into your food. Is it worth the trouble? I would say a resounding YES.

Health Hazards of Added Sugar

Added sugar creates inflammation in the body, raises blood acidity levels, causes excess mucus and is the fuel that cancer thrives on. Sugar converts to fat, contributes to blood sugar problems which in turn can contribute to diabetes. Heart health problems, high blood pressure, dementia and obesity are also linked with sugar. Each of these areas on their own could fill a book, as there is so much information about it.

The single most important piece of health advice I can pass on to my clients, is to avoid this kind of sugar altogether. This means as a habit don’t add sugar to your food or buy food that has sugar added to it. Of course, there are times where this isn’t realistic, but your daily habits are the thing I would like to emphasis and where you can make real gains. Also, there are alternatives, which I go over below.

A healthy diet should be very low in added sugar, low in non-vegetable carbohydrates and contain some protein.

Does the Body Need Sugar?

Sugar is broken down in the body to produce glucose. Glucose is used by every cell for energy, with the brain needing a large proportion and without which it could not function. This does not mean that lots of sugar equals a healthy brain – but the brain does need a steady supply. When the supply of sugar is not steady then there are clear side affects, such as hypo- or hyperglycemia (diabetes).

Your body controls sugar by secreting insulin, a hormone to keep sugar levels within a certain safe range.

Because sugar comes in many different forms and not just the crystalline granules we put in our tea or coffee, most average people get far too much and this glucose gets stored as fat.

Avoiding Added Sugar

Added sugar has no nutritional value whatsoever. In fact, added sugar leaches nutrients out of your body.

Unfortunately, when we label-read in a supermarket, there are so many names that sugar can come under, that’s it’s easy to miss. Here are just some:

Corn syrup or high-fructose corn syrup, Dextrose or crystal dextrose, Fructose, Maltose, Lactose, Sucrose, Glucose, Evaporated cane juice or fruit juice, Caramel, Carob syrup, Brown sugar, Raw sugar, Dextrin and maltodextrin, Rice syrup, Molasses, Evaporated corn sweetener, Confectioner’s powdered sugar, Agave nectar, Other fruit nectar (for example, pear nectar)

Processed foods often contain high levels of added sugar that has been separated from its original co-nutrients. This means that it is ingested in the body without the fibre, healthy fats or protein that naturally slow down the sugar absorption.

Foods to watch out for include things like sweetened yogurts, breakfast cereals, snack bars, sweet treats, juices, fizzy drinks – with high amounts of refined sugar and fructose.

Non-Vegetable Carbohydrates

Sugar comes in many forms. Sugar is in syrups, candy, cakes, soda, alcohol, canned fruit and vegetables, peanut butter and jam, pickles and relishes, mayonnaise, powdered milk, processed meat, bread and even cigarettes.

A double handful of dried pasta equals about three tablespoons of sugar. Potato, bread and rice also are very high in a form sugar, all of which your body has to process and which will end up being a form of glucose.

Giving your body high amounts of carbohydrates like rice, pasta, potatoes and bread, as well as other simpler forms of sugars, will contribute to weight gain and many more conditions, such as inflammatory conditions, skin problems, joint and muscle pain, insomnia, elevated cholesterol, increased mucus production, impaired immunity, mental fog, depression, lack of libido, and dizziness.

When blood sugar levels go up insulin is produced in the body which triggers fat to be stored on the body. It also creates free radical which act on the body by destroying cells and shortening their life span.

Natural Sugars

Fructose is the form of natural sugar found in small amounts in fruits and veg, which usually have a good balance of the different forms of sugar. If you are eating a balanced diet it’s not something to worry about because the body is geared up to metabolize these kinds of natural sugars with their co-factors that are found in the fruits and vegetables themselves. Including fresh vegetables and fruits in your diet is shown through research to help protect against disease and is a healthy option. Added sugar is the focus of concern, not natural sugars when eaten in their wholefood form.

One thing to note however, is that some natural products have very high amounts of fructose, such as honey and agave. In fact agave (which is often processed) contains more fructose than the dreaded High Fructose Corn Syrup. Evidence suggests that large amounts of fructose consumption is actually the most damaging form of sugar for your health. While honey is also a concentrated form of sugar, you can buy it in its natural form and if eaten in moderation does offer some health benefits.

Fat Free Doesn’t Mean Sugar Free

One of the troubles with low fat foods is that the way the taste is compensated for is often through added sugar.

Fat is not actually the problem. Healthy fats are essential to good health.

Sugar Alternatives

Of course we all like to have sweet treats and while alternatives.

I recommend avoiding processed sweeteners, such as aspartame.

The one sweetener I would opt for is the herb Stevia because it doesn’t increase blood sugar levels. You can use this in cooking or to add to your tea and coffee, meaning that you don’t have to sacrifice sweet treats.

Case Example

Here is an example of the above with a client of mine who visited me.

When I saw Sarah she was a 32 year-old sales rep working long hours. Her main complaints were that she was over weight, constantly tired yet could not sleep well at night and was also experiencing mood swings that included anxiety and depression. She also said that she felt she looked terrible and her skin and complexion was lacking tone, with an unhealthy complexion.

Sarah was working some 50-60 hours a week and was relying on several strong coffees every day and a couple of alcoholic drinks at night to get her through the day.

On top of all this, her performance at work was now under threat since her production was being affected by her condition and this was causing her to go into a diminishing spiral of low morale and further emotional strain.

Sarah’s diet was our first issue. Typically she was having a muffin (packed with sugar), orange juice and a coffee with one sugar for breakfast. Sometimes she would skip lunch – but if she did have lunch it would be a sandwich with salad and meat. Dinner was typically pasta and vegetarian sauce or grilled meat with potato and vegetables with a glass of wine.

Well this is a pretty typical diet for most you might think – and you would be right!

Sarah’s orange juice, muffin and coffee were causing a massive spike of insulin – she said it helped her “wake up” but this was causing an acceleration of the ageing process and causing adrenal exhaustion in her body. The bread she was having at lunch was competing for digestion with the meat in her sandwich and causing more weight gain and the pasta at night was dramatically causing further blood sugar spikes increasing weight gain.

There is another key thing wrong with Sarah’s diet ? virtually no protein.

I got Sarah to drop out the pasta, muffin, orange juice and bread as these were the main culprits in her fatigue, weight gain and other symptoms.

In its place she introduced an omelet for breakfast made with 1 whole egg and two egg whites. Lunch was chicken or turkey with salad dressed with olive oil and lemon juice. This was followed by a salad in the evening with grilled salmon or tuna. I told her that having a glass of wine was fine with her evening meal. This was a high protein, low carbohydrate diet.

In addition to this, minerals in specific forms and amounts were introduced. She also started on a homeopathic formula to help with stress and anxiety, a multivitamin mineral supplement to give her B vitamins and antioxidant and trace minerals for energy.

Two weeks later Sarah returned looking quite different; happy and bright. She was sleeping well and energy was way up. Sagging in her face and eyes was visibly reduced and her face looked toned and healthy. She said she was feeling bright mentally and her anxiety had gone.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

 

12 07, 2017

Is a Vegetarian Diet Healthy?

2017-10-18T11:08:54+00:00 By |Foods, Nutrition|

Which Diet Choices are Right for You?

Diet plays a huge role in our health. After all, we are what we eat.

I’ve met so many people who follow different diets, from Paleo and vegan to meat-based and vegetarian. All have their merits, and often it is finding which one best suits your constitution, likes and dislikes, and how long you follow it for. There are some important factors to take into account to ensure you get sufficient nutrition.

I have seen people follow difficult exclusion diets, thinking that it is a healthy choice, but worryingly it can result in poor health if not done with a lot of care. I have seen unhealthy vegetarians and vegans particularly who can assume that they are having an excellent diet, yet they start to develop health problems because of lacking vital nutrients. Likewise, meat-inclusive diets can also be unhealthy, if not done in balance.

So, what’s the answer?

Below I have looked at some of the common diets I see people following:

VEGETARIAN DIET

A vegetarian diet, which includes some animal derived foods, such as eggs, dairy and fish, is something I believe can provide a healthy and balanced diet with the vital nutrients your body needs. It does take care to get the correct balance of nutrients, and if this is not done deficiencies in vitamin B12, calcium, iron, and zinc are not uncommon. Countless studies have shown that a well-planned, nutritious, plant-based diet is associated with a lower risk of obesity, heart disease, diabetes and stroke, as well as with longer life expectancy.

VEGAN DIET

Veganism has become increasingly popular, so much so that when I was interviewed last week on BBC Radio they wanted to talk about the huge rise in the sales of vegan ice cream. In fact the sale of vegan foods has risen by a whopping 1,500% in the last year alone.

Veganism excludes all types of animal produce – including not only meat but also eggs, dairy and seafood. Statistics show that most people become vegans for ethical reasons. However, if you are choosing veganism purely for health reasons, there are important points to consider, as complete absence of all animal based foods can take its toll. Initially, following a purely vegan diet will most likely give a lift and bounce to someone’s health. I believe this is linked with the change to a mostly raw and plant-based food diet. What is more complex though, is the long term affects.

Quite simply, there are nutrients that can’t be obtained from plants. Some of these include, long-chained omega-3 fats, carnosine, taurine, carnitine, retinol, vitamins D3 and B12 and conjugated linoleic acid. After 6-7 years, B12 can be so rundown in the liver that neurodegenerative and neurological diseases can start to come about. Iron and zinc deficiencies are not uncommon either.

Getting sufficient healthy fats is a significant problem for vegans. The previously vilified saturated fat has now been recognized as an important part of a healthy diet. Many of these saturated fats come from animal sources. Essential omega 3 fats sourced from fish are very important for good health and despite small amounts of omega 3 being available from flax or linseed for example, it’s not sufficient. Forgoing marine sourced DHA is something that is a problem.

Another regular problem I come across with vegans is protein deficiency. This is because some vegans base their diet on foods like pasta and vegetables without getting sufficient protein rich vegetables as they do in places like India, which include chick peas, lentils and pulses.

For vegans and vegetarians generally, I suggest having nutritional levels checked regularly so that these can be topped up where possible.

TYPICAL WESTERN DIETS TODAY

For many people today, we are consuming too much protein, meats and processed foods. Increasing vegetable intake is only a good thing. Following a 70% vegetarian diet is what I usually recommend to most clients – protein from animal sources are fine to have, but the idea is to have meat, fish, eggs, but with plenty of vegetables too. The vast majority of your diet should be made up of whole, fresh vegetables, fruits and salads. The need for carbohydrates, such as a bread and pasta can vary from person to person, but these should not be excessive. If possible when consuming meat I recommend organic, and fish I recommend non-farmed.

There is so much to say about diet, and if you have any questions please let me know and I’m very happy to go over this with you relating to your specific requirements.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

7 07, 2017

What’s the Truth about Dairy?

2017-10-18T11:11:09+00:00 By |Ailments, Foods, Nutrition, Uncategorized|

Is Dairy Right for You?

We used to take for granted that cow’s milk was good for us. Indeed many people believe that their health will be jeopardized if they don’t have milk regularly, something that has been pushed hard by the commercial dairy industry. In addition, milk itself was a very different product in the past, when it was drank in its raw, unpasteurized, un-homogenised form – but this is not what we are buying in supermarkets today.

I don’t recommend pasteurized milk at all.

In fact, I’ve been told by a few farmers that if a calf is given supermarket (pasteurized/homogenised) cow’s milk it will kill the calf within 72 hours.

PASTURISED COW’S MILK

Pasturized milk and raw milk are two very different things, but pasteurized milk is the product we are exposed to and consume on a massive scale. The calcium content after pasteurization is hard for the body to take up, so the very reason people are drinking it is compromised. In addition, other vitamins, enzymes and nutrients are destroyed through the pasteurization process.

The idea that the cow’s milk we buy in supermarkets may contribute to the very diseases it’s meant to prevent is controversial.  The story of milk is one of evidence and counter-evidence. At stake are enormous commercial interests, deeply rooted patterns of agriculture and consumption – and our health.

PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH MILK

The anti-milk lobby claims that consumption of pasteurized dairy products contributes to diabetes and can aggravate rheumatoid arthritis and has been implicated in colic, acne, heart disease, asthma, lymphoma, ovarian cancer and multiple sclerosis. Studies suggesting a link between milk and prostate cancer have been appearing since the 1970s, culminating in findings by the Harvard School of Public Health in 2000 that men who consumed two and a half servings of dairy products a day had a third greater risk of getting prostate cancer than those who ate less than half a serving a day. In the same year, T Colin Campbell, the Jacob Gould Schurman Professor of Nutritional Biochemistry at Cornell University, said that “cows’ milk protein may be the single most significant chemical carcinogen to which humans are exposed”.

MILK ALLERGY

The idea that cows’ milk is the most complete food to serve youngsters is widespread. Even as long ago as 1974, the Committee on Nutrition of the American Academy of Paediatrics (AAP) was answering the question, “Should milk drinking by children be discouraged?” with a “maybe”. Today the AAP has changed its mind and now recommends dairy products for children.

It is widely accepted that some people are allergic to milk, although this implies that problem lies in the individual’s constitution, rather than milk. Yet, when you look at it more closely, the extent of lactose intolerance is extraordinary.

Lactose is the sugar in milk, which needs to be broken down by lactase in our intestines and bowels. If the lactose we absorb is greater than our lactase capacity, undigested lactose travels to the large intestine, where it ferments, producing gas, carbon dioxide and lactic acid, which in turn causes bloating, cramps, diarrhea and wind.

In practice I often see a link a between digestive problems and milk, as well as skin problems, glue ear, sinus problems, asthma, eczema and more.

BENEFITS RELATED TO MILK

To milk advocates, this is outrageous and they present counter arguments. They counter that milk actively protects against a whole cluster of diseases, reducing the risk of hypertension and perhaps kidney stones, that it helps remineralise tooth enamel and can be positively anticarcinogenic (particularly against colon cancer). What’s more, Harvard University’s huge Nurses’ Health Study found a lower risk of breast cancer in pre- (but not post-) menopausal women who consumed a lot of low-fat dairy foods such as skimmed milk. Even more dramatic is a Norwegian study of premenopausal women that showed those who drank three glasses of milk a day had a 50% lower incidence of breast cancer. But before you reach for the milk, another Norwegian study found that those who drank three-quarters of a litre or more of full-fat milk a day had a significantly greater risk of breast cancer than those who drank more modest amounts. And so it goes.

CHILDREN AND MILK

The best milk for babies and infants is breast milk. The worldwide average age for stopping breastfeeding is about four years old – and this is ideal, but in Australia, UK and other western countries it tends to be much lower.

After the first year of life children don’t necessarily need milk so long as they are having a diet that provides the balance of nutrients needed in sufficient quantities. It’s best to contact me if you have a small child and want to work out whether to include milk in their diet and which type. It’s very important that a small child is receiving the right nutrition and milk can be useful and easy for many children, depending on how a child responds to it.

OSTEOPOROSIS

There’s often the idea that milk helps to protect against osteoporosis because of the calcium content.

Mark Hegsted, a retired Harvard professor of nutrition, has said, “To assume that osteoporosis is due to calcium deficiency is like assuming that infection is due to penicillin deficiency.” In fact, the bone loss and deteriorating bone tissue that take place in osteoporosis are due usually not to calcium deficiency but rather to its resorption: so it’s more an issue of our bodies excreting too much calcium.

To help protect against this the key thing is to have a balanced diet. For example too much protein has been linked to a leaching of calcium in the body, so the most important thing is to get the balance in.

I also recommend supplementing with a balance of minerals. To make sure that calcium is absorbed in the body, it also needs to be taken with a balance of other minerals. Many practitioners consider osteoporosis to be more of a magnesium deficiency rather than a calcium deficiency, as a magnesium deficiency opens the door to a leaching of calcium from the bones and prevents its absorption also. Vitamins D3 and K2 are also very important for good calcium and magnesium balance and absorption. Contact me to find out more.

CHEMICALS IN MILK

There are other controversies with milk too. Only today I read about chemicals found in milk in the Daily Mail (UK) in an article titled ‘It’s not all white: a cocktail of up to 20 chemicals in a glass of milk’ The article states, “A glass of milk can contain a cocktail of up to 20 painkillers, antibiotics and growth hormones, scientists have shown. Using a highly sensitive test, they found a host of chemicals used to treat illnesses in animals and people in samples of cow, goat and human breast milk. The doses of drugs were far too small to have an effect on anyone drinking them, but the results highlight how man-made chemicals are now found throughout the food chain. the highest quantities of medicines were found in cow’s milk.”

RECOMMENDATIONS

I don’t generally recommend pasteurized or homogenised cow’s milk. There are some different types of cow’s milk on the market today, which are healthier, including A2 milk. Different milks you can try include goats milk, sheeps milk, Almond milk, oat milk, A2 milk, lactose-free milk and rice milk.  Also of note, milk from older types of cows, such as Jerseys, Asian and African cows are less likely to cause problems.

With infants, if the ideal situation of breastfeeding has ceased early, then I recommend that you monitor how your child reacts to cow’s milk or goat’s milk, either the formulas or milk from the carton (depending on their age). It’s not recommended to introduce other types of milk to small children.

There are also some useful homeopathics that help to correct health issues associated with milk intolerance that can be applied. Additionally, probiotics help to build resistance to milk allergy.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

7 07, 2017

Vegan Ice Cream Recipe

2017-10-18T11:12:47+00:00 By |Foods, Nutrition|

How to Make Vegan Ice Cream

Dairy free, vegan ice cream, a delicious treat for the summer days, and a winner with kids too!

Making your own ice cream might seem daunting, but if you have an ice cream maker it really is very easy. What’s more, you avoid damaging vegetable oils, additives, preservatives, colourings, sugars, etc.

This is a lovely recipe. All you need to do is combine all the ingredients in a blender and then churn in an ice cream maker for 20 minutes before freezing. If you don’t own an ice cream maker, you can blend all the ingredients and then put it in the fridge for several hours – taking it out and mixing it with a fork every now and then until frozen.

  • 2 (400ml) cans full of coconut milk (put in fridge before use)
  • 3/4 cup cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup

Enjoy!

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

29 03, 2017

Juicing Benefits

2017-10-18T11:14:55+00:00 By |Foods, Nutrition|

Juicing Your Way to Good Health


Incorporating fresh juices into your daily routine is an easy and enjoyable way to ensure you are having fresh, raw, unprocessed foods in your diet.

Juicing helps to pre-digest the nutrients, which in turn promotes a higher absorption level. Juicing also helps you to include more vegetables into your daily diet. Juicing has broad effects across a person’s health and in fact are considered remedies their own right.

A personal favourite of mine is carrot, apple and ginger as a healthy energy tonic. The ginger is also particularly useful as it is a stomach tonic to help settle upset or sensitive digestion. I recommend you drink the juices straight after you make them so as to prevent valuable nutrient loss It’s best not to mix vegetable and fruits (other than apple) because of the fermentation that can occur. You don’t need to follow recipes necessarily and can have fun experimenting.

Here are some of the nutritional qualities of common ingredients:

Cucumber: Kidney tonic, skin tonic.

Cabbage: Stomach repair, joint stiffness.

Beets: Blood cleanser, gall bladder and liver tonic.

Broccoli: Renowned for anticancer properties.

Blueberries: Antibacterial properties and eases digestive upsets and cystitis.

Apples: Liver tonic, gall stones.

Celery: Nerve tonic, helps to relieve joint pain, good source of potassium.

Garlic: Blood cleanser, decongestant, and antiviral and antibacterial properties.

Ginger: Circulatory and digestive tonic.

Spinach: Excellent sources of carotenoids and Vitamin C.

Pears: Good source of fibre, Vitamin C and bioflavonoids.

Wheat Grass: Super-antioxidant.

Cranberries: Flavonoids, anti bacterial and anti inflammatory, kidney cleanser.

Carrots: Blood cleanser.

I also often suggest taking a good quality multivitamin for energy levels, and also as a general supplement to give your body the tools and equipment it needs on a daily basis.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

29 03, 2017

Spilling the Beans on Coffee

2017-11-01T10:09:17+00:00 By |Foods, Nutrition|

Is Coffee Good or Bad?

I’m often asked about whether or not coffee is good or bad for us so I wanted to give you some more information about this, which will also apply to strong teas. Some of us seem to be able to tolerate caffeine better than others. I recommend that heavy coffee drinkers, that is those who consume more than 2-3 cups of instant coffee a day or who have more than one filter coffee a day (cappuccino, latte’s, espresso, long black, etc) in particular take steps to reduce caffeine intake.

I have been asked is the “buzz” of energy from coffee bad for me?  Many people think, “I can’t get up and out in the morning without my coffee.”

Another question is how coffee causes the bowels to move.  Some people say, “I am regular as clockwork as long as I drink my coffee.”

It is important to have energy and to regularly detoxify waste from the body; however, for the good coffee appears to be doing, when you understand how coffee does this, you may want to reconsider drinking coffee.

Understanding Why Coffee Affects the Bowels

Most people are aware of the ill affect of drinking coffee because it contains caffeine.  Actually, coffee is a narcotic beverage.  The caffeine in the coffee belongs to the same chemicals as morphine, cocaine and strychnine.  It is no surprise then why people have such a difficult time, at first, letting go of coffee, and replacing it with healthier beverages.  Caffeine combines with the stomach acid and forms a potent toxin.  As this toxin is absorbed into your portal circulation and hits your liver, bile is released in an attempt to flush the toxin from your system.  This accounts for the increase in bowel “regularity” which many coffee drinkers experience.

Coffee Contains Harmful Chemicals

Drinking decaffeinated coffee is no better than drinking regular coffee because of the large concentration of the chemical Trichloroethylene.  It is used mainly as a de-greasing agent in the metal industry and as a solvent and dry cleaning agent in the clothing industry.  Trichloroethylene is related to plastic chemical vinyl chloride, which has been linked to certain types of liver cancer. Columbian coffee planters have regularly used deadly pesticides on their plants for over 20 years.  Some include Aldrin, Dieldrin, Chlordane and Heptachlor.  Some speculate that coffee beans are the most significant source of these deadly toxins in U.S.

The extreme temperatures in the roasting process of coffee beans depletes the beans of its natural oils.  Though it may enhance their aroma, high heat actually causes the oils to become rancid.

Coffee Overworks the Adrenals

Coffee has an acid-based oil which is an irritant to gastric mucosa. It simulates the secretion of gastric acidity and this results in secretion of adrenalin, which in turn stimulates insulin secretion with consequent secondary hypoglycaemia.  The end results are tension, mild rise in blood pressure, 2-3 hours later a craving for sweets, low energy and mood levels, and over working of the adrenal glands.  All of which negatively affects health.

Coffee Causes Nutritional Deficiencies

Heavy coffee drinkers create Thiamine (Vitamin B1) insufficiency.  Symptoms of Vitamin B1 insufficiency range from fatigue, nervousness, general malaise, general aches and pains to headaches.

Regular use of coffee prevents some of the nutrients in your food from being absorbed effectively in your small intestines, which leads to further vitamin and mineral deficiencies.

The Buzz from Coffee

The “buzz” or stimulation you get from coffee actually contributes to re-bound fatigue when the stimulating effects wear off.  Repeated stimulation can contribute to the exhaustion of key organs like the liver, pancreas and adrenal glands.

Long Term Coffee Drinking May Contribute to Toxic Liver

Because of the overload on the liver to detoxify chemical residues, long-term coffee drinkers often have a toxic, congested liver and impure blood.  The function of the liver is to filter the blood so the blood can nourish the cells.  Just like your car’s oil filter, filters the oil that gets distributed through your automobile.  When the liver is congested, it cannot function properly.  The blood does not get filtered and it circulates through the body depositing impure blood into the cells.  The cells, then, cannot regenerate and grow healthy tissue.  The long-term effect, when cells cannot regenerate, is its opposite — degenerative cells  which leads to degenerative diseases.

An example of a toxic, congested liver is dark spots on the skin as the person gets older.  Some people refer to them as brown or liver spots.  In later years, these spots merge to the point that they no longer appear as spots, but discoloration of skin.  Other examples include a lack of absorption of minerals resulting in gray hair, a protruded stomach, constipation, spastic colons, irritable bowels, a swollen or enlarged gall bladder, and high cholesterol and triglycerides, even after faithfully following a cholesterol-free or limiting diet.  In fact, many new clients come to me frustrated because they have been watching their cholesterol intake for months, even years, and still have high cholesterol.  This is a definite sign that the liver is congested and over-producing cholesterol.

Weaning Off Coffee

If you are a heavy coffee drinker and want to reduce your coffee consumption this needs to be done gradually. Coming off coffee “cold turkey” can produce some quite uncomfortable side effects, such as headaches and nausea. If someone is drinking, for example, eight cups of coffee a day they should go to seven cups of coffee for a couple of days, then six for a couple of days, and then five and so on. Reducing the size of your cup and the strength of the coffee is another way you can gradually reduce the amount of caffeine and wean off the coffee. Another useful tip is to say to yourself when you want to have a coffee that if you still want it in 30 minutes time you can have it then, very often people forget and the craving passes. Healthy alternatives include herbal teas, pure water, or hot water with a slice of lemon.

Conclusion

To improve your health, it is important to eliminate toxic substances from your diet, such as coffee and strong teas, and then detoxify the chemical residues in the liver, resulting from long-term ingestion of these substances.

Some health benefits reported from clients during and after this process are: beautiful skin (liver and brown spots disappear – even in the elderly); gray hair turns to natural colours of brown or black, cholesterol and triglycerides become normal without following a cholesterol-free diet, stomachs become flatter that never could before even with exercise, energy and endurance increases, gall bladders improve, bowels eliminate regularly without spasms or irritability, blood pressure becomes normal and many others.

For information about detoxifying the liver and helping reduce coffee consumption please contact me directly. There are natural remedies that can help with craving for coffee also.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

29 03, 2017

Chocolate – Good or Bad?

2017-10-18T11:17:13+00:00 By |Foods, Nutrition|

Chocolate is the most common craving by far that people tell me about in consultation

Magnesium Deficiency

Chocolate cravings are often associated with Magnesium deficiency and this is something that can corrected using nutritional supplements and/or homeopathy.

Stories of Health Benefits

Stories about health benefits of consuming cocoa products have increasingly made the news following the discovery that they are an excellent source of a type of antioxidant which is believed to protect against heart disease, cancer, and various other health problems.

Chocolate manufacturers and retailers have been running with these findings by both trying to make chocolate lovers feel less guilty about their addiction and taretting the more health-conscious consumer with “research studies” praising the supposed benefits of eating chocolate, such as:

  • Releases endorphins in the brain which serve as pain-relievers,
  • Appetite increases without causing weight gain,
  • Sugar in chocolate may reduce stress levels while also having a calming and pain relieving effect,
  • Does not cause acne and skin problems,
  • Isn’t related to migraines,
  • Increases life expectancy,
  • Reduces the risk of heart disease and cancer.

When you take a closer look at these studies, if you discard the studies funded by chocolate interest groups, you will see that the ones left behind offered conflicting results.

Cocoa

As expected some isolated compounds in cocoa did show certain health benefits, with the research being positive largely because the “co-factors” (all the other detrimental ingredients in chocolate) were not part of the study.

If people were to consume pure cocoa, then they might indeed be able to enjoy a few health benefits, including a positive effect on blood pressure and glucose metabolism, however the majority of people eat processed chocolate with all the other less desirable ingredients (such as added sugar, corn syrup, milk fats / dairy cream, hydrogenated oils, and more), and where the actual cocoa content may be less than 20%.

Sugar

Sugar has broad destructive effects throughout the body, suppressing digestive enzymes and causing inflammation and toxicity, and it is the sugar content of chocolate that is the main problem. Hydrogenated oils will contribute to circulatory congestion and other health problems.

While sugar has been shown to have some minimal pain relieving effects, it’s highly unlikely that that anyone is going to reach for sugar if they have a migraine or some other form of pain.

While cocoa and sugar do not “cause” acne, the sugar present in chocolate will most certainly make acne worse.

The chemicals in chocolate have been shown to trigger migraine headaches. Of all the foods isolated that triggered the most attacks, chocolate was an offender about 30% of the time.

Dark Chocolate

Premium grade dark chocolate is preferential to milk chocolate or lower grade chocolate, particularly in relation to cholesterol levels, although regular consumption is still high in calories.

Cocoa products also contain stimulants and are addictive in nature.

Summary

Generally speaking, people who eat a lot of chocolate sooner or later start to feel the effects on their health. Chocolate is basically a junk food. As is the case with any other junk food it needs to be kept to a minimum and ideally avoided altogether.

I hope all the chocolate lovers find this useful.

On this site, I aim is to provide well-researched information, in order to empower readers to make informed choices about their health and wellbeing. In both alternative and allopathic medicine new discoveries are being made and there are vast choices available to people, something to be mindful of. Nicholas Dale, Naturopath is not seeking to impose his views on readers, but rather encourage them to seek out any professional help they may need (in whatever form that may take) and discover what is best for them.

Information on this site should not be taken as medical guidance or advice. Readers should always consult personally with their healthcare provider. Information published on this site is not intended to act as a substitute for advice of medical professionals, and should not be taken as such.

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